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Spring Course: Blogging about Cognitive Science

This spring, Prof. Seana Coulson & grad student Rose Hendricks will lead a seminar on Cognitive Science blogging. (more)



Núñez, Rafael, and Fias, Wim. (2015). "Ancestral Mental Number Lines: What Is the Evidence?." Cognitive Science.
Over the last two decades substantial efforts have been made to investigate the question of whether the building blocks of human mathematical concepts ultimately have their origins in biological evolution. A relevant case study is the “mental number line” hypothesis, which states that numbers are represented in the brain as spatial entities along a mental line, yielding behavioral manifestations. Some developmental (de Hevia & Spelke, 2009, 2010), cross-cultural (Dehaene, Izard, Spelke, & Pica, 2008a), and comparative (Drucker & Brannon, 2014) studies have suggested that number-to-space mappings—underlying mental number lines—are biologically endowed universals, emerging independently of language and culture. Recently, going further, Rugani, Vallortigara, Priftis, and Regolin (2015) have argued that newborn domestic chicks (Gallus gallus) map numbers to space resembling humans’ mental number line, and they claimed that “spatial mapping of numbers from left to right may be a universal cognitive strategy available soon after birth” (p. 536). After training newborn chicks to circumnavigate a centered panel depicting a target numerosity (5 elements for some chicks, 20 for others), the researchers allowed the chicks to explore an environment containing two panels—to the left and to the right, displaying identical numerosities either smaller or greater than the target (2 or 8 elements, and 8 or 32, respectively). The authors reported that around 70% of the time the chicks preferred the left panel when the numerosity was smaller than the target and the right one when it was greater. They interpreted these results as evidence that there is a left-to-right number-to-space mapping in newborn chicks that resembles humans’ mental number line. But do the data really support these claims?
Creel, S. C., Rojo, D. P., & Paullada, A. N. (In press). Effects of contextual support on preschoolers’ accented speech comprehension. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology.
Young children often hear speech in unfamiliar accents, but relatively little research characterizes their comprehension capacity. The current study tested preschoolers’ comprehension of familiar-accented vs. unfamiliar-accented speech with varying levels of contextual support from sentence frames (full sentences vs. isolated words) and from visual context (four salient pictured alternatives, vs. the absence of salient visual referents). The familiar-accent advantage was more robust when visual context was absent, suggesting that previous findings of good accent comprehension in infants and young children may result from ceiling effects in easier tasks (picture fixation, picture selection) relative to the more-difficult tasks often used with older children and adults. In contrast to prior work on mispronunciations, where most errors were novel-object responses, children in the current study did not select novel-object referents above chance levels. This suggests that some property of accented speech may dissuade children from inferring that an unrecognized familiar-but-accented word has a novel referent. Finally, children showed detectable accent processing difficulty despite presumed incidental community exposure. Results suggest that preschoolers’ accented speech comprehension is still developing, consistent with theories of protracted development of speech processing.
Cooperrider, K., Slotta, J., and Núñez, R. (2016). Uphill and Downhill in a Flat World: The Conceptual Topography of the Yupno House. Cognitive Science.
Speakers of many languages around the world rely on body-­‐based contrasts (e.g. left/right) for spatial communication and cognition. Speakers of Yupno, a language of Papua New Guinea’s mountainous interior, rely instead on an environment-­‐based uphill/downhill contrast. Body-­‐based contrasts are as easy to use indoors as outdoors, but environment-­‐ based contrasts may not be. Do Yupno speakers still use uphill/downhill contrasts indoors and, if so, how? We report three studies on spatial communication within the Yupno house. Even in this Hlat world, uphill/downhill contrasts are pervasive. However, the terms are not used according to the slopes beyond the house’s walls, as reported in other groups. Instead, the house is treated as a microworld, with a "conceptual topography" that is strikingly reminiscent of the physical topography of the Yupno valley. The phenomenon illustrates some of the distinctive properties of environment-­‐based reference systems, as well as the universal power and plasticity of spatial contrasts.

Featured Classes
Spring 2017:
  • COGS118C: Neural Signal Processing
  • COGS160: Advanced Interaction Design
    This is a studio class for students who are passionate about diving deep into interaction design and honing their design skills. Introduces social computing, input & interaction techniques, and information design. Students will regularly present work in a studio format. Pre-req: (CSE 8B or CSE 11) and (Cogs 120 or CSE 170).
  • COGS160: Communication in Infancy
    A mixed Practicum/Seminar course designed to provide hands-on experience in research on infancy and early childhood. Students learn skills and are assigned responsibilities based on the project to which they are assigned. Students also participate in a journal club and prepare brief end-of-quarter presentations and reports. This is a 3 quarter sequence: content, skills, and responsibilities evolve and expand every quarter. Contact Dr. Deak [gdeak@ucsd.edu] directly for permission to enroll in this course.
  • COGS160: Brain Waves
    This course will provide an introduction to rhythms and large-scale electrical potentials of the brain. Topics will include the resonance properties of neurons, rhythmic interactions between neurons, and the coordination of activity across large populations of neurons that is measurable in the local field potential (LFP) and electroencephalogram (EEG). In addition, this course will discuss the advantages of temporally coordinated neural activity, and the insights that can be gained about the brain and cognitive disorders from studying this coordination. Pre-req: Cogs 17 or Cogs 107A.
  • DSGN100: Prototyping
    Note: DSGN 1 is required and priority will be given to Design Minors; to come the first week of class to see if you can get in. Explores cognitive principles of thinking through making. Introduces methods and tools for prototyping user experiences. Students make various prototypes and participate in weekly critique sessions. Topics: experience design, rapid prototyping, sketching, bodystorming, cardboard modeling, UI hacking, and design theory. Prerequisites: DSGN 1.
  • COGS180: Neural Coding/Sensory Systems
    This course covers recent advances in the understanding of common neural mechanisms and computational principles underlying the brain’s ability to process multiple sources of sensory information—vision, audition, olfaction, touch, and equilibrioception—and translate them into actions. Prerequisites: Cognitive Science 1, Cognitive Science 14B, Cognitive Science 101A, and Cognitive Science 109.
  • COGS122: Interaction Design Startup
    Explores tools and processes for innovating novel business concepts to solve problems involving the interaction between humans and technology. Students will work with an interdisciplinary team to understand unmet user needs and to create a value proposition that balances technical feasibility, financial viability, and desirability. Pre-req: COGS120 or COGS187A or COGS187B or DSGN100.

Research Opportunities (199s)
  • How children reason about the social world?
    Want to work with Dr. Adena Schachner’s Mind and Development Lab on studies exploring how children reason about the social world? We would like to invite motivated students to join our lab as research assistants for Winter Quarter 2017 and beyond (minimum 3 quarter commitment). We are currently running studies ...
    (click for details)

Recent News & Links (see all)


Intuit: An Employers Perspective on Landing the Internship

TIPS AND TRICKS: An employers Perspective on Landing the Internship

Join Intuit for a panel discussion with a few of our university recruiters amd recent grads. Learn tips for interviews, offer negotiation, and communication wth employers. 

 


EDS 198: Teaching Computational Thinking for Everyone

Teaching Computational Thinking for Everyone

EDS 198 (Directed Group Study) - Dr. Beth Simon

T/Th 12:30-1:50 - Spring 2017

 

Do you believe that computation and computing is critical for everyone in the 21st century?  Do you want to help others learn, not only how to program, but how to think logically, debug technical situations, and create video games in a simple programming language?  If so, this class is for you!


Tech Talk and Pre-Hack Tutorial

Teradata is hosting a tech talk and pre-hack tutorial on Monday, February 27th 6-8pm in the Qualcomm Conference Center. There will be pizza!


Artificial Intelligence and Cognitive Services Hackathon

The Artificial Intelligence and Cognitive Services Hackathon sponsored by Teradata will be held from March 3rd-5th, 2017 in the CSE building.


UC Executive Order-Immigration Resource

The University of California has a released a website with information on immigration and resources relevant to the Executive Order.


Winter 2017 Design@Large Talks

Design@Large

CSE Building, Room 1202

Wednesdays 4pm - 5:15pm


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